2012 - ARC Future Fellows funding scheme results

2012 ARC Future Fellow Awards, Announced 25 July 2012.

ARC Future Fellowship Award Recipients

Dr Richard Fuller
Optimising the ecological performance of cities - $670,064

Dr Salit Kark
Systematic prioritisation of action for confronting invasive vertebrates in Australia - $818,856
 

ARC Future Fellowship Awards - Project Summaries

Dr Richard Fuller
Optimising the ecological performance of cities
One of the most environmentally destructive impacts that people have is also one of the greatest triumphs of modern civilization—the city. This project will study more than 1000 cities across the world to discover how we should build our cities into the future to achieve economic and social growth in a way that causes minimal environmental harm.

Dr Salit Kark
Systematic prioritisation of action for confronting invasive vertebrates in Australia
This project will use novel scientific approaches to effectively prioritise action for mitigating the threats invasive vertebrate pests pose to humans and to biodiversity in Australia. Results will inform policy and management, substantially advancing our understanding of the key factors shaping spatial invasion sources, hotspots, drivers and impact.

2011 - ARC Future Fellows funding scheme results

The School of Biological Sciences has been awarded $1.34 million in new research funding to commence in 2011.

2011 ARC Future Fellow Awards, Announced 14 November 2011.

ARC Future Fellowship Award Recipients

Dr Diana Fisher
The role of life history and food supply in the extinction of carnivorous marsupials - $629,360

Dr Katrina McGuigan
Understanding phenotypes: contributions from studying mutations in a model organism - $713,248

ARC Future Fellowship Awards - Project Summaries

Dr Diana Fisher
The role of life history and food supply in the extinction of carnivorous marsupials.
This project will test why marsupial predators show exceptionally diverse species lifespan and reproductive traits, reveal how these are affected by prey supply and climate change, and how they are linked to alarming species declines in our north. Understanding causes of vulnerability will help to focus conservation efforts to avert extinctions.

Dr Katrina McGuigan
Understanding phenotypes: contributions from studying mutations in a model organism.
The distribution of fish across aquatic habitats will be determined jointly by the swimming speed and endurance requirements imposed by features of the environment, such as water flow, and by the swimming capacity of the fish. This project will use zebrafish to characterise how body shape and physiology interact to determine swimming capacity.

2010 - ARC Future Fellows funding scheme results

2010 ARC Future Fellow Awards, Announced 17 November 2010.

ARC Future Fellowship Award Recipients

Dr Sureshkumar Balasubramanian
Genomics of temperature response in plants - $700,927

A/Prof Christine Beveridge
Strigolactone, a new plant hormone: its regulation, role and potential for plant improvement - $774,692

A/Prof Bryan Fry
Adaptive evolution of coleoid (cuttlefish, octopus, squid) venoms - $791,360

A/Prof Dustin Marshall
Understanding and predicting invasion in the sea: a mechanistic approach - $695,571

Dr Kerrie Wilson
Prioritising habitat restoration for biodiversity and ecosystem service outcomes - $669,327

ARC Future Fellowship Awards - Project Summaries

Dr Sureshkumar Balasubramanian
Genomics of temperature response in plants.
Climate change is predicted to have negative impacts on Australian agriculture. This project will use genomic tools to uncover biological mechanisms for plant response to temperature that will help design crop varieties that are more tolerant to higher temperatures.

A/Prof Christine Beveridge
Strigolactone, a new plant hormone: its regulation, role and potential for plant improvement.
This project will investigate a new plant hormone, one of only 10 or so discovered to date in plants. This hormone regulates shoot number, water and nutrient uptake and the ability of shoots to generate roots and develop wood. The Project will produce genetic tools and describe new processes for applications in sustainable plant improvement.

A/Prof Bryan Fry
Adaptive evolution of coleoid (cuttlefish, octopus, squid) venoms.
This project represents an opportunity for biodiscovery from the venoms of cuttlefish, octopuses and squids. The independent adaptation for venom active at the subzero Arctic and Antarctic polar waters is of particular evolutionary interest. However, their divergent, bioactive compounds are also a rich drug design resource.

A/Prof Dustin Marshall
Understanding and predicting invasion in the sea: a mechanistic approach.
Marine invasive species cost millions of dollars each year. This project aims to determine how and why invasive species out compete native species around much of the coast of Australia. Identifying the conditions that help invasive species outcompete native species will help managers reduce the spread and impact of marine invasive species.

Dr Kerrie Wilson
Prioritising habitat restoration for biodiversity and ecosystem service outcomes.
An emerging carbon market will provide funds for habitat restoration over the coming decades, but this will only be realised through careful prioritisation and planning. This research will prioritise investments in habitat restoration in order to cost-effectively achieve biodiversity conservation and ecosystem service protection goals.
 

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